How wide is a 2×4 metal stud?

Thus a metal stud taking the place of a two-by-four measures 1 5/8 by 4 inches, and a two-by-six, 1 5/8 by 6 inches — slightly fatter but the same depth as their wood equivalents.

What is the width of a metal stud?

Metal Stud Sizes

The most common size stud is a 3 5/8″ wide stud. Combined with a layer of 5/8″ gypsum wall board on both sides will give a 4 7/8″ thick wall.

What is the width of a 3 5 8 metal stud?

Exterior Structural

Member Depth Flange Width Material Thickness (GA)
3-5/8″ – 12″ 1-3/8, 1-5/8″, 2″ & 2-1/2″ Leg 14 ga 68 Mil
3-5/8″ – 12″ 1-3/8, 1-5/8″, 2″ & 2-1/2″ Leg 12 ga 97 Mil
2-1/2″ – 12″ 1-1/4″ – 1-1/2″, 2″ & 2-1/2″ Leg 20 ga 33 Mil
2-1/2″ – 12″ 1-1/4″ – 1-1/2″, 2″ & 2-1/2″ Leg 18 ga 43 Mil

How thick are metal stud walls?

Thickness: 33 mils (20ga), 43 mils (18ga), 54 mils (16ga), 68 mils (14ga) and 97 mils (12ga). 33mil (20ga) and 43mil (18ga) framing products are produced with 33ksi steel. 54mil (16ga), 68mil (14ga) and 97mil (12ga) products are produced with 50ksi steel unless otherwise noted.

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How are metal studs measured?

Determine how far apart the steel studs will be located and divide the linear feet of the perimeter by that number. Steel studs are typically located 16 inches apart so divide the perimeter in inches by 16. If the perimeter is 60 feet, or 720 inches, then 45 steel studs will be needed.

Are metal studs nominal dimensions?

Wood framing is commonly referenced in nominal terms. A 2×4, for example, is really 3-1/2″ x 1-1/2″. Metal framing on the other hand, is referenced by actual size.

How wide is a framing stud?

Typical dimensions of today’s “two by four” is 1.5 by 3.5 inches (38 mm × 89 mm) dimensional lumber and typically placed 16 inches (406 mm) from each other’s center, but sometimes also at 12 inches (305 mm) or 24 inches (610 mm).

What are the sizes of metal studs?

Here are some examples of metal stud sizes as it relates to the thickness:

  • 26 gauge (0.551 mils)
  • 24 gauge (0.701 mils)
  • 22 gauge (0.853 mils)
  • 20 gauge (1.006 mils)
  • 18 gauge (1.311 mils)
  • 16 gauge (1.613 mils)
  • 14 gauge (1.994 mils)

How far are studs apart?

The general spacing for wall studs is 16 inches on center, but they can be 24 inches. At my home, the exterior wall studs are spaced at 24-inch centers, but the interior walls are 16 inches on center.

What are the standard depths of metal studs?

Standard Sizes

  • 1-5/8″
  • 2-1/2″
  • 3-1/2″
  • 3-5/8″
  • 4″
  • 5-1/2″
  • 14″

What gauge are metal framing studs?

Most contractors are familiar with the light-gauge steel studs and track you can buy at lumberyards and drywall supply houses. These studs are usually 25-gauge steel with 1 1/4-inch flanges and are intended for non- load-bearing applications such as partition walls.

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Are metal studs cheaper than wood?

Cost-effective: While never as cheap as wood, steel studs are now only about 30-percent more expensive than wood studs. Lightweight: Steel studs are lighter to carry and store than wood because they are hollow.

Are metal studs stronger than wood studs?

Wooden studs are stronger than metal studs.

They can support a lot more weight, being made from heavier material themselves. Wooden studs can be used on load-bearing walls, new cabinets, doorways, and frames to stay sturdy and strong.

How thick is a 20 gauge metal stud?

For example, 20-gauge interior wall partition studs have a thickness of 0.76 mm (30 mil), while 20-gauge structural studs have a minimum thickness of 0.84 mm (33 mil).

How far apart are studs in Texas?

When a home is framed, the wall studs are usually spaced 16 or 24 inches apart. If you start in a corner and measure out 16 inches and you don’t find a stud, you should find one at 24 inches.

How thick is a 6 metal stud?

A 600S metal stud measures 6 inches on its web, or long face. Thus a metal stud taking the place of a two-by-four measures 1 5/8 by 4 inches, and a two-by-six, 1 5/8 by 6 inches — slightly fatter but the same depth as their wood equivalents.